How to find a lost cat!

How to find a lost cat!

What if you find a cat?

We always want to help cats that come into our lives but if you find a cat in your yard and you don’t know if it has an owner, consider using a paper collar to send a message to the owners. Download this template if you need one. Or if you can catch or trap it, then get it scanned for a microchip and contact the owners. It might be a stray that is looking for home, it might be a semi owned or unowned cat and if that is the case you need to decide if you will take the cat on as your own, or if you can rehome it. You can see if your local area has a trap neuter release program if the cat is not neutered. All cats deserve a special place to call home. If everyone helped just one cat out there on the streets, we could make a big difference in controlling the population and make the world a better place for them all.

Don’t give up.

If you have moved to a new house, or if your inside cat has escaped, it is probably still very close to the exit point. Do not be fooled by its silence and reluctance to respond to you. Your cat might be able to hear you, but probably will not respond if it is scared. They are surprisingly silent when out in the unknown. Do not give up on your cat. It takes an average of 2-4 weeks to find them, and it all depends on your persistence. Your cat is waiting for you to find it.

Other blogs you might like

Music Sooths

Music Sooths

I recently did an interview with Ron from thepetcalmer.com about PetTunes. It was really interesting to get to understand how cats hear and respond to sound. We were talking after the interview and Ron was telling me about this mother cat and her kittens who were...

FIP is no longer a death sentence

FIP is no longer a death sentence

FIP is a horrible disease but is no longer a death sentence for cats. There have been considerable developments in the treatment of this and this podcast has all the latest info with FIP Warrior Australia’s Angela Irvine.

FIP warriors Australia and New Zealand group

The following are scientific and online articles about the wonderful findings and work being done in this area.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2020/05/remdesivir-cats/611341/

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378113518301603

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190213100442.htm

https://www.vin.com/apputil/Project/DefaultAdv1.aspx?pId=99&catId=102069&id=8124390

CLICK HERE

To listen to the podcast

Other blogs you might like

Music Sooths

Music Sooths

I recently did an interview with Ron from thepetcalmer.com about PetTunes. It was really interesting to get to understand how cats hear and respond to sound. We were talking after the interview and Ron was telling me about this mother cat and her kittens who were...

Music Sooths

Music Sooths

I recently did an interview with Ron from thepetcalmer.com about PetTunes. It was really interesting to get to understand how cats hear and respond to sound. We were talking after the interview and Ron was telling me about this mother cat and her kittens who were experiencing a stressful birthing process.

The veterinarian monitoring the birth allowed a Pet Tunes Feline be placed nearby playing special cat music.

Mother cat calmed down within minutes and the kittens were able to enter this world more easily and in good condition.

The reason the birth went from stressful to calm was due to the mother cat naturally relaxing allowing nature do its thing.

 

We have found the same with using this product. I was surprised at just how quickly it works and what a difference it makes. I only share what i find works and is a great product. I also love the science behind why it works.

 

You can contact Ron Pia, Founder of thePetCalmer Here and email him on pets@thepetcalmer.com Mob. +61 (0)439 068 878

Other blogs you might like

Music Sooths

Music Sooths

I recently did an interview with Ron from thepetcalmer.com about PetTunes. It was really interesting to get to understand how cats hear and respond to sound. We were talking after the interview and Ron was telling me about this mother cat and her kittens who were...

8 Myths you need to know about desexing your cat

8 Myths you need to know about desexing your cat

Just the other day I was having a conversation with a friend of mine. She was telling me about a stray cat that seems to be unowned that returns every xmas to have kittens in her mother in laws shed. Every year they try to catch her, every year she is to sly to get caught. She sneaks in when they go away with their caravan for the holiday break and when they come back there is often kittens running around in their back yard. They have set traps and had family try to catch her while they are away but she moves the kittens as soon as they return and they escape getting caught and handed in.

This has been happening for around 10 years and every year the cat has around 5 7 kittens. That’s 50-70 kittens unowned going back into the population, not desexed, not microchipped, not loved.

 Now its not the property owners responsibility to try to catch this cat, even thought they have tried. They often even forget about her until they return home and realise its time to try and catch her again. But she is way to smart and quick for that. This cat may have been the offspring to another unowned cat that also had 50-70 kittens over a 10 year period. And that cat might have started at the age of 6 months having kittens. So you can see that it is very easy for cats to populate. They are very good at it.

 

Not all of these kittens will survive. Some will be picked off by large prey birds. Some will be attacked by dogs. And some will simply starve to death once mum stops feeding them. Its not much fun out there on the street for a cat. And lets not even get started on how many cats are run over by cars every year.

Then we also need to look at the issues around wildlife. Cats are great for keeping mice and rats down but they also take out native flora and fauna. We want cats to do their job but we also need to respect the environment and do our part to keep those animals safe and sound to.

This is why it is so important to desex all cats unless we are deliberately letting them breed. Its very unfair to allow more unwanted kittens to be born to then have terrible lives and often die young.

There are many myths around desexing cats. Let’s look at some of those and lets look at the scientific evidence around them.

Neutering will cause behavioural changes.

This is not a myth. But its not what you think. The behaviours that change are marking their territory and being aggressive, more so for males than females. The fluctuation in hormones means they are less likely to go in search of a mate and roam.

My pet is to young.

Female cats can come into their first season as early as four months of age, and males can father kittens from 6 months old. Neutering you cat before they become sexually mature will ensure thre is not ooppsy litters. There is always risks to any surgery but trained professionals can easily neuter cats from 12-16 weeks of age. Your cat is given a general anaesthetic and will feel no pain. Some mild discomfort afterwards but most cats recover very quickly. Males in particular are less likely to develop habits of marking and spraying if neutered early as it doesn’t become a behaviour they know.

My cat will get fat.

Weight gain has nothing to do with neutering and everything to do with exercise and overeating. Cats can be lazy if they have nothing to do. Encouraging exercise and keeping an eye on how much and what they are eating will help keep them at a healthy weight.

Its best for animals to have one litter first.

Cats don’t experience parenthood like we do. They done yearn for it like we do. Their hormones take over and they do what nature intended. I have heard that people love the idea of kids seeing the miracle of childbirth, but how about you teach your kids responsible pet ownership instead.

I love my pet and I want another just like them.

Sorry, each cat is different. You will never replicate your loved pet. This is about you and your fear of loosing your best buddy. Its not thinking in their best interests

My cat is a purebred so I should breed him.

Leave that to those that have a special interest in breeding. Breeding is much more than putting a couple of cats together. Check out this blog to find out how much work it really is (http://thecatmumma.com/how-to-find-a-reputable-cat-breeder/)

I don’t let my cat out so it shouldn’t matter

If they are not neutered, they will get out if they feel that urge. If they are indoors then you will find you will have a much better house mate if they are neutered.

I don’t want my male cat to feel less of a man.

Sorry guys and girls, cats don’t understand sexual identity or ego. That’s your own feelings about what humans think about loosing the family jewels. Unless you are going to be a responsible cat breeder, do your cat a favour, get him neutered.

So, what exactly do they do when they de-sexed a cat?

There are many names used to talk about desexing your cat. de-sexed, fixed, altered, sterilized or un-sexed and of course neuter and spaying. Both spaying and neutering are safe and permanent surgeries. Spaying refers to female pets and is a major surgical procedure in which both ovaries and the uterus are surgically removed from your pet. Neutering, which is also called castration, refers to male pets, and is a minor surgical procedure in which both of the testicles are removed.

Don’t add to the problem, be part of the solution.

 

Other blogs you might like

Music Sooths

Music Sooths

I recently did an interview with Ron from thepetcalmer.com about PetTunes. It was really interesting to get to understand how cats hear and respond to sound. We were talking after the interview and Ron was telling me about this mother cat and her kittens who were...

The Golden Years: looking after old cats

The Golden Years: looking after old cats

Old cats need extra consideration, just like our older humans.

Looking after these guys is so important and easier than you think. They need lots of love and attention and we need to have our detective stills ready to work out the puzzles they will bring to us as they age. Here are my top tips to ensuring your golden oldie keeps doing well.

Look out for change in habits: Any change in behaviour is a good indication that age is setting in. It can be a puzzle sometimes that you may have to solve so understanding what is usual behaviour and not normal behaviour is paramount. Contained cats are much easer to see issues with as you can monitor them much better than cats that roam.

 

Watch the Old Cats YouTube Video

Diet and nutrition: as cats get older their diets may need to change. We found that traditional cat food would make our oldest vomit so we had to experiment to ensure the right foods were given to him. There are many senior cat foods on the market, the trick is to ensure that the quality of the food is good. He has a couple of different foods that he does really well on. It can be a bit of an experiment for a while to find the right balance but worth it once you see them eating well and enjoying their food. We have now found one that everyone enjoys that he can stomach with no issues. This might change again in the future and we will constantly have to check on how this works.

Water: The amount an old cat drinks can be a good sign that things might be an issue. If they are drinking more and you notice their litter box is wetter than usual it might be sign and time for a vet check-up to get their kidneys in particular checked. Keep more than 1 water bowl around the house to make it easy for them to keep hydrated.

Signs of pain. Cats are good at hiding if they are in pain. They do this so they don’t look weak to others but it does make it harder to work out if they are in pain. There is a list of things here to look for.

  • Difficulty jumping up on to what they once could, being slower to get up and out of the way. Or just not wanting to walk or move.
  • Being unsettled or trembling or aggressive
  • Not wanting you to pat them or pat a area.
  • Overly grooming one body area or not grooming at all.
  • Reduced appetite
  • Hiding and making it not easy to find them. Avoiding bright areas

All of these are good examples of signs of pain.  

Temperature control. Older cats particularly in colder climates can suffer if hey do have pain. Heat pads and heated beds can help this. Put it in an area that they can access easily. They will use it if they feel the need.

Dental health If their teeth aren’t the best then look at oral care dry food that may help with that. Check that the teeth are clean, earlier rather than later. Old cats will lose the odd tooth here and there so don’t panic to much if they do. Make sure they can eat dry food. Out old boy likes the wet food mostly with a little bit of dry food as well. Mixing the 2 can make it easier for them to eat the dry if they are struggling with it. If you feed them raw chicken wings or necks from an earlier age you will find their teeth in much better condition as this helps them remove the build-up of plague

Exercise and mental stimulation: The best thing you can do for your old pal is stimulate their mental and physical abilities. Anything from playing with them to giving them a paper bag to sit in can help. New textures, smells and things to explore and occupy their mind is excellent. They are no different to old humans. Mental and physical stimulation will occupy their time and make their life more fulfilled. Ramps and pet stairs can also help them get up to areas that they are struggling to reach. Don’t make it to easy for them. Still make them move. You know what they say, use it or loose it.

Beware of changes in weight: if your cat is noticeably heavier or lighter then get it checked out. Regular vet checks are important at this stage of their life.

Pay attention to the litter box: if it’s getting harder for them to get into the litter box you might have to invest in one with lower sides that makes it easier for them to get into and out of. Puppy pads on the floor outside of the box can help with any other mishaps. The litter box will be very helpful in seeing changes in behaviour, frequency and consistency of what your cat expels. 

Your cats needs will change as they age. What works today might not work tomorrow. Learn what is normal behaviour for your cat so you can spot any unusual behaviour. And above all, love them while they are here. It breaks our heart that they don’t live forever so enjoy them while they are with you and give them everything they could ever need or want.

Other blogs you might like

Music Sooths

Music Sooths

I recently did an interview with Ron from thepetcalmer.com about PetTunes. It was really interesting to get to understand how cats hear and respond to sound. We were talking after the interview and Ron was telling me about this mother cat and her kittens who were...

Containing Cats – What does it mean?

Containing Cats – What does it mean?

Cats and humans have coexisted for centuries. But times are changing. We need to ensure that they are well looked after, as well as protecting other native animals from them, especially in built up city locations.

For years it was acceptable to let the cat out to roam at they liked. But our cities are now getting overpopulated with unwanted litters of kittens being an issue every year. There are lots of journal articles referencing scientific studies that have done research into suburban cats, their health, and the damage they can do. Cat Containment and desexing nonbreeding cats can go a long way to helping with these issues.

The thing I hear often is that it is unfair to keep cats contained because they should be able to roam free. If we don’t allow our dogs to do this, why are cats any different? Should we be encouraging their territorial nature and hunting instincts?

I am a big advocate of containment. There is no reason that a cat needs to go off your property. Cats don’t need to roam. Keeping them contained stops them from fighting, from being hit by cars, and it has been scientifically proven that they suffer less injuries and avoid diseases. This is beneficial to the health of the animal and reduces vet bills for the owner (Cat Alliance of Australia, 2018, Eyles and Mulvaney, 2014). Contained cats can live to up to four times longer than roaming cats (Allen, 2017). The secret is that cats need to have adequate enrichment in their environment dependant on their breed and personality.

So why don’t more people contain their cats to their property? There is the belief that its not easy to keep a cat inside if they want to go out which is true to some extent. Unlike a dog, they can easily climb and jump fences so keeping a cat contained needs a little more thought. But it doesn’t have to be an expensive exercise.

Cat containment doesn’t mean you have to keep the cat inside all the time, although some cats are quite happy to stay inside. Containing cats is getting easier and easier to accommodate these days as companies are now providing retrofitting services. They will come to your property and make changes to ensure the cats that live there have great spaces to explore and live. There are also outdoor portable options that can be set up and taken down as necessary.

Bringing  a cat into your life should be a carefully thought out consideration. If you are going to own any animal you need to ensure that you can provide a good clean safe environment for them to live, correct dietary requirements and lots of love. It doesn’t matter if it’s a pedigree cat or rescue, all cats deserve a good life.

Other blogs you might like

Music Sooths

Music Sooths

I recently did an interview with Ron from thepetcalmer.com about PetTunes. It was really interesting to get to understand how cats hear and respond to sound. We were talking after the interview and Ron was telling me about this mother cat and her kittens who were...